Finally! The beaded nightmare is over.

It’s taken almost exactly four years. Started (according to my notes on Ravelry) 22 August 2008 and finished 5 August 2012. (Not completely finished, because I don’t have any buttons. Apparently four years’ notice is insufficient time for me to buy buttons.) This cardigan has accompanied me through four years of my return-to-knitting after a decade’s hiatus. It’s also seen me get considerably better as a knitter and a finisher. Which is why some of the cast-ons are different and the increases and decreases progress towards greater smoothness as I’ve learned new techniques and applied them every time I’ve returned to it. It also shows some other things that I learned too late – there are three little lumps in the back which are from before I discovered you really shouldn’t join on a new ball in the middle of a row, and you definitely shouldn’t if you’re knitting with cotton.

The pattern’s called Faye – it’s a Kim Hargreaves from a Rowan collection whose name escapes me (I got it out of the library – you’re allowed to photocopy up to 10% of a book without breaching copyright) as it was so long ago.

The proportions aren’t as nice as the picture when you knit the largest size (which is only a medium – 36” chest) – it’s short in proportion and therefore a bit boxier. It’s also difficult to get the buttonholes spaced evenly as the pattern asks you to mark out the buttons on one front-band and then knit the buttonholes on the other as you get up to the button-places. The amount of stretch in the bands means that you can get quite different numbers of rows between buttonholes. If I was doing it again (unlikely!) I’d set a particular number of rows for between-buttonholes and then sew the buttons on to match the holes. In the largest size about every 40 rows of moss stitch between each buttonholes would be right, I think.

Photos of it being modelled when I have good weather, husband, camera and cardigan all in one place!

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One thought on “Finally! The beaded nightmare is over.

  1. Pingback: Blanketed | Knit Oxford

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